Topics: Events

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1845 - North Coastal - view

The Sydney Morning Herald reports the “last Aboriginal of Sydney had died, a beggar who slept outside the gates of the Legislative Assembly”. In reality there were many hundreds of survivors of the invasion.

1845 - North West - view

Like the Brisbane Water report, it observes that the local Aboriginal population is diminishing. This effects young and old, with many children seldom living through their first winter and elderly people dying during the last winter of cold and hunger

1846 - 1864 - North West - view

Aborigines are regularly or occasionally working throughout the Hunter Valley as farmhands, stockmen, domestic servants, trackers, timber getters and other such roles on many larger properties

1846 - North West - view

Death of Biraban

1846 - North West - view

Aboriginal population of the Hunter region is reported as sharply diminishing

1846 - North West - view

“from the want of sufficient Legal Evidence owing to the testimony of an aboriginal unconverted to Christianity, not being admissible in a criminal prosecution, I found that it would have been useless to have committed the assaulter Hauttey for trial

1847 - North West - view

Johnny is arrested near Sackville on a charge of being of unsound mind. Johnny “vent[s] his spleen in rather a novel fashion…by flooding the ear of one of his captors with…saliva”. Johnny is sent to the Hospital for the Insane , Parramatta

1848 - North West - view

Jacky-Jacky returns south to a hero’s welcome, before returning to his people around Singleton

1848 - North West - view

Jackey is honoured for his fortitude and loyalty to the explorer. Sir Charles Fitzroy , the governor of New South Wales, presents him with a silver breast-plate

1848 - North West - view

Aboriginal man dives into a deep waterhole in the bed of Sugarloaf Creek (now South Creek) and finds the boy’s body

1849 - North Coastal - view

Bowen Bungaree, Bungaree’s son, sails with other Koories to the Californian gold fields with Richard Hill because of their skill in sailing boats and in the hope to be given jobs to carry the crowds of gold seekers flocking to the Eldorado. Black Bowen is the only one to return. He speaks with ridicule about America, “That country! No wood for fire, but plenty cold wind … no good for me! No good for blackfellows!” On his return Bowen resumes his duties as a Police Tracker and reports to police the activities of two assigned servants (convicts) who had escaped and are petty thieves on the Northern Beaches. The men are captured and sent to prison. Bowen’s reputation is now well established, for example he tracks and uses his gun to hunt the bush-ranger Casey. Bowen wear grand clothes, Farrell describes him: “He was in full rig with dress coat, his hair knotted up behind with three feathers stuck in it”.

1850 - North West - view

The focus shifts from Wollombi to the Hunter River with the construction of the railway through Singleton and major flooding which causes severe hardship to people living in Wollombi region

1850 - North West - view

Allowing for administrative anomalies, blanket lists record a diminishing number of Aborigines receiving blankets between the Hawkesbury River and Upper Hunter districts

1850 - North West - view

M’Gill , tells the government official in the Lake Macquarie region that “they all cursed the Governor”. At the same time, several Aborigines in the Hunter region demand to know why “the governor does not give [us] blankets to wear in winter, when it is murry cold”

1850 - North West - view

During 1869:“blacks of the [Paterson] district muster in strong force at the Court-house, in hopes of receiving their usual supply of blankets [but]…had to go away disappointed”

1850 - North West - view

Numerous Aboriginal groups decide to try their hand at farming in pockets of vacant land existing within the mosaic of white settlement

1851 - South West - view

" They were lost, and are found."

1851 - South West - view

three children having strayed into the desert at the back of Appin

1851 - North West - view

We see no Blacks here between Freeman’s Reach and Portland Head

1851 - North West - view

Murphy, Tommy Potts, Martin and King John of the Maitland tribe, and Jemmy and Richard Wiseman of the Sugarloaf tribe are apprehended. The jury returns a verdict of wilful murder against some other Aboriginals unknown